Monday, October 1, 2018

Good Guav Peeps All Guav

Mid October in southern California brings a wonderful fruity smell to the streets.  After grapefruit season is over and the figs have come and gone, the spotlight is on guavas.  This year, I've come across three types of guavas growing in the local area; pink, yellow, and pineapple.  We turn to my trusted source, the side of the street, which is especially prolific in older neighborhoods that have massive fruit trees!
Firstly, the pink.
Yellow:

3 very much ignored pineapple guava trees on my school's campus:
The fruits are almost the same color as the leaves, so they can be hard to notice.
The pineapple guavas have thicker skin than the previous 2 types, and they're still hard when they fall off, so there isn't much, if any, damage to them. 
These trees have been dumping so many guavas, I picked up 3 massive bowls full in one week.  It's like an Easter egg hunt in October!
I had so many guavas, I decided to blend them into a yummy puree.
Pink:
Yellow:
Pineapple:
How to they compare in taste?  Pink seems to be the default choice, as they have a wonderful rich flavor.  Yellow, on the other hand, are more subtle but wonderfully sweet.  Think of a banana vs. a strawberry.  Pineapple guavas are by far the sweetest, which is likely the origin of the name.  The taste is like very strong candy, and could even be unbearable to most.  The skins are particularly harsh, so when I blended it I tried both with and without the skins. While it was more bearable without the skins, scooping out the pulp was quite labor intensive.  Pineapple guavas have much smaller, unnoticeable seeds compared with the other too.  I've actually seen types without seeds, but the ones with seeds had juicer flesh for some reason.  I didn't bother filtering the seeds out of the pink and yellow ones, so it left a nice crunch to them.
Watching train videos while eating waffles and guava, what better way to spend a Friday night?

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